Humboldt State University ® Department of Chemistry

Richard A. Paselk

 

General Chemistry

Fall 2008

Exercise: Net Ionic Equations and Redox Balancing

© R. Paselk 2008
 
 

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Balancing by Inspection - Net Ionic Equations

Write Balanced Net-Ionic Equations for the following Reactions in Aqueous Solution:

FYI - Solubility Rules

It is useful to remember some simple "rules" (really more like guidelines) to help in predicting reactions. For common compounds such as we see in general chemistry we can use the following rules:

  1. Nitrates (NO3-) are all soluble.
  2. Alkali metal (Li+, Na+, K+, Cs+, and Rb+) and ammonium (NH4+) salts are all soluble, with the exception of a few Lithium salts.
  3. Chloride, bromide, and iodide (Cl-, Br-, and I-) salts are generally soluble, except for the salts of silver, lead(II) and mercury(I) (Ag+, Pb2+ and Hg22+).
  4. Sulfates are soluble, except for the salts of barium {BaSO4}, lead(II) {PbSO4}, mercury(II) {HgSO4}, and calcium {CaSO4}.
  5. Most hydroxides are only slightly soluble (but see rule 2).
  6. Sulfides (S2-), carbonates (CO32-), phosphates (PO43-), and chromates (CrO42-) are only slightly soluble (but see rule 2).
  1. Copper metal (Cu(s)) is immersed in an aqueous solution of silver nitrate (AgNO3). The solution turns light blue and a silver coating appears on the copper.

  2. Dilute solutions of antimony(III) chloride and sodium sulfide are mixed to give a precipitate.

  3. Dilute solutions of silver nitrate and potassium iodide are combined and give a yellow precipitate.

  4. Dilute solutions of aluminum chloride and sodium hydroxide are mixed, giving a gelatinous precipitate.

  5. Dilute solutions of calcium chloride and sodium phosphate are combined to give a precipitate.

  6. Dilute solutions of nitric acid and sodium hydroxide are mixed, generating heat.

  7. Dilute solutions of sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide are mixed, generating heat.

  8. A dilute solution of hydrochloric acid is poured over limestone (calcium carbonate) and a non-flammable, odorless gas is released as the rock dissolves.

  9. Dilute solutions of lead(II) nitrate and sodium chloride are combined and give a white precipitate.

  10. Dilute solutions of barium chloride and sodium sulfate are combined to give a white insoluble precipitate.

Answers 1-10


In addition to these exercises you should familiarize yourself with the text materials.


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© R A Paselk

Last modified 23 October 2008