COMM 100: Fundamentals of Speech Communication

FALL 2017 - UNITS: 3.0   INSTRUCTOR: James Floss E-MAIL: jmf2@humboldt.edu
TIMES/CRNs: MWF A: 41440:
10 - 10:50am (SH116); B: 41426: 3 - 3:50pm (SH02);

TU/TH: C: 41427: 11:00 - 12:20pm (TA11) D: 41428 1:00-2:20 (SH116) 

TYPE: Lecture OFFICE: Hs. 54 Rm. 5 (basement) Office Extension: 826-5422
OFFICE HOURS: MWF 11:00 to 11:50am. See my teaching schedule to make appointments for other times.

Course Description: Fundamentals of Speech Communication is an introductory course into the principles of public speaking. It includes communication theories and skill-building exercises designed to make you a better speaker in public and professional contexts. From Catalog: Introductory course. Develop oral communication abilities for functioning effectively in various settings. Fundamental communication theory.

University Objectives General Education Area A – Oral Communication Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of Comm 100, students will be able to:
       • Students will demonstrate the discovery, critical evaluation, and reporting of information by designing an appropriately organized and credibly supported speech, using techniques to inform and/or persuade an audience.
       • Students will deliver a speech using effective verbal and nonverbal skills.
       • Students will critically listen to and analyze oral communication.
       • Students will explain the role that oral communication plays in human societies.
Note that the above are minimum outcomes. All Comm 100 courses must require at least two graded speeches and a written analysis of a spoken message. Most courses require much more in terms of performance and analysis.

HSU Requirement Communication in the English language--to include both oral and written communication--and critical thinking. Goals: Courses in area A sharpen a student's ability to think clearly and logically, to find and critically examine information, and to communicate orally and in writing. Requirements: Students need a minimum of nine lower division units in Area A, including a three-unit course in each of three categories: oral communication, written communication, and critical thinking. These should be taken in the freshman year (not later than the sophomore year).

Course Objectives for Major: If this course serves your major, identify course goals, objectives and learning outcomes specific to the major (see college website for pdf file of model language for goals, objectives and learning outcomes).
1. Students will effectively demonstrate an original, formal, and researched speech.
2. Students will demonstrate competence in reflective analysis of persuasive discourse.
3. Students will demonstrate basic competency in written communication.
4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of diversity in relationship to communication.
5. Students will demonstrate fundamental understanding of how knowledge is generated in the Communication discipline.

This course explicitly contributes to students’ acquisition of skills and knowledge relevant to HSU Learning Outcomes:
HSU graduates will have demonstrated:
1. Effective communication through written and oral modes.
2. Critical and creative thinking skills in acquiring a broad base of knowledge and applying it to complex issues.
3. Competence in a major area of study.
4. Appreciation for and understanding of an expanded world perspective by engaging respectfully with a diverse range of individuals, communities, and viewpoints.
HSU graduates will be prepared to:
5. Succeed in their chosen careers.
6. Take responsibility for identifying personal goals and practicing lifelong learning.
7. Pursue social justice, promote environmental responsibility, and improve economic conditions in their workplaces and communities.

Required Materials: The Art of Public Speaking by Stephen E. Lucas, edition 12e, is required; it is available for rental through the bookstore. A cheaper rental can be found here. 10th or 11th editions can be searched for online; they will work but page numbers referenced on the schedule will not align. Reading assignments for each class session are outlined in the accompanying schedule. A packet of class forms, assignment descriptions and evaluation sheets is also required; available within the class web site or for purchase at the bookstore.

Student Goals: Through this course you will develop an understanding of the basics of speech communication and its application to public speaking. In addition, you will improve your listening skills (essential for effective discussions and critiques of speeches) and your critical thinking skills necessary to successful speech preparation and presentation.

Major Assignments, Speeches: Each student will present three graded speeches; they are: Intro Speech, 2 to 3 minutes in length; Informative Speech, 5 to 7 minutes in length; and Persuasive Speech, 7 to 9 minutes in length. Speeches should be written at least three days before they are delivered. Expect to spend several hours of rehearsing before delivering your speeches. The informative and persuasive speeches will require extensive academic research.

Klamath Connection Students: All of your speeches will need to relate to your involvement in the Klamath Connection. In the Intro Speech, you will be expected to introduce in some way your reasons for involvement in the program. Your Informative Speech should inform us about issues you are studying with your cohorts, and your Persuasive Speech speech should examine an issue you leaned about in another KC class with a policy to address it. Your research projects in this class can be related to your research projects in other Klamath Connection courses.

Other Assignments, Written Critiques: The accompanying schedule outlines each class session and includes writing assignments that are due. The general requirements for speech critiques are 850 words of typewritten prose in standard academic format. Papers can be turned in up to a week late, with a penalty of 10 points.

Grading: Major assignments and your participation in the class will be assigned a letter grade (an additional page supplies the criteria for their assignment). Each grade is equivalent to a number of points, as indicated below. Standardized evaluation forms are used for each speech; find them in your packet or on the web. Written assignments are worth a certain number of achievable points. Late submissions and speeches reduce the number of points you can earn. Preparation outlines are not accepted late. Approved extra credit activities can be used to augment the total of points. The maximum points attainable is 1050 but your grade is determined out of 1000. The summary is as follows:

Intro Speech

100 points

Informative Speech

200 points

Persuasive Speech

250 points

Final Exam (your choice of multiple choice or essay)

200 points

Writing Assignments

150 points

Attendance

100 points

Class Participation
50 points

Total (50 points buffer built in; see note below)

1,050 points

A more detailed breakdown of each category follows. First, the point value of letter grades assigned:


A

A-

B+

B

B-

C+

C

C-

D+

D

F

Intro Speech

100

95

87

80

73

67

62

58

54

50

0

Informative Speech

200

190

178

165

153

142

132

123

115

108

0

Persuasive Speech

250

238

224

210

196

184

173

162

151

140

0

Class Participation

50

47

44

41

38

35

32

29

26

23

0

Final Exam

200

190

178

165

153

142

132

123

115

108

0

 

Attendance: You are expected to attend each class session; many will include lectures and activities that cannot be made up. You will learn and profit greatly from watching and analyzing other's speeches and activities as much as you will from your own. Each unexcused absence will reduce your total 100 attendance points by 20 points for MWF students and 25 points for TuTh students. Each time you arrive late (or leave early) you will lose 5 points. Only medical absences that can be substantiated will be excused. If you choose, you can make up missed classes (up to 5) by critiquing real speeches given outside of the classroom; check HSU website, bulletin boards and the LumberJack for guest speakers coming to campus. Simply submit a paragraph stating who you saw, when, where, about what and a few sentences relating the experience to what you are learning in the course.

Writings: Point values of specific writing assignments are as follows:

Assignment

Points

Intro Speech Critique

30

Informative Speech Critique

30

Intro Speech preparation outline

20

Informative Speech preparation outline

30

Persuasive Speech preparation outline

40

TOTAL POINTS FOR WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

150

 

Extra Credit: 50 points are built into the syllabus as a grading buffer. You can "spend" these points by not making up an absence or not turning in a paper or however you choose. If you still get far behind due to too many missed classes from crises, extra-mural activities, or the like, extra credit projects can be negotiated at the instructor's discretion.

General Responsibilities: It is always assumed that students have read the assigned chapters for any day; discussions and activities will be based on those readings. If it is determined that most of the class is not reading required chapters, a surprise quiz based on readings might be given. Please note the days set aside for speeches; all students are expected to perform on scheduled days. It is also expected that students respect the classroom setting and their classmate's speeches. Cell phones must be turned off on speech days. A ringing cell-phone (or other disruptive behavior) will deprive the perpetrator of 10 points for the disruption. Please do not eat or drink during speeches. Do not enter or leave the classroom during speeches.

Late Speeches: The specific days to present speeches will be assigned randomly by computer. All students are expected to be ready to give their speech on their assigned days; late speeches are strongly discouraged. Any speech delivered late will receive reduced points: a full grade lower. For example, an "A-" level speech will receive a "B-" point value. The only exceptions are for speeches missed for medically substantiated reasons. If you miss your speech slot due to illness, be prepared to email your full preparation outline on your assigned day. There is no guarantee that time will be available for late speeches. Late speakers should be ready to use the next available speech slot. Preference for available time will be prioritized: first, students who missed due to illness, secondly, students re-presenting enhanced speeches, and lastly for those speakers who were unprepared for their speech day.

Re-presented speeches: It is possible to substantially improve your grade on speeches after consultations, substantial reworking of your speech, and a second presentation. This opportunity will be available on a case by case basis after reaching an understanding with the instructor on ways to improve your speech. Speakers who present late speeches will not have this opportunity. Preparation outlines are not re-graded.

 

 

Success in this class: Your ultimate success in this class will be due to diligence and good time management. If you really want to excel in this class, be prepared to:

  1. Keep up with the readings and strive to retain each chapter's material.
  2. Choose speech topics as soon as possible.
  3. Begin your research immediately.
  4. Have your preparation outline (your speech text) completely finished three or four days before your speech date.
  5. Put in several out-loud rehearsals before giving your speech .

Final Exam: For the final comprehensive exam you have a choice of taking an essay-type or a multiple-choice exam. The essay-type exam will be assigned a letter grade (see table above). The multiple-choice exam will have 100 questions. Scantron form 882-E is needed and a #2 pencil. Each correct answer earns 2 points for a total of 200.

Final Grade: Your final grade will be determined by the total number of points earned out of a maximum of 1000. A letter grade will be assigned according to the following table:

 

 

Point Spread

Final Grade

950 - 1000

A

900 - 949

A-

850 - 899

B+

800 - 849

B

750 - 799

B-

 

 

Point Spread

Final Grade

700 - 749

C+

650 - 699

C

600 - 649

C-

550 - 599

D+

500 - 549

D

under 500

F

 

 

OTHER UNIVERSITY POLICIES regarding academic honesty, add/drop, emergencies and the like can be found here:
http://www2.humboldt.edu/academicprograms/syllabus-addendum-campus-resources-policies